Wednesday, 8 August 2018

A Very Little Llama

Inspired by everything llama at the moment, I realised that one of my previous patterns could be easily adapted to fit the bill...



You may remember The Very Little Giraffe (a random teacher gift my daughter asked me to make)? Well it struck me that the shaping was pretty llama-esque and with a little tinkering around with the ear placement, and the addition of a blanket and tassels, a llama it could be ...



It's the perfect small project for using up all those odds and ends of yarn - hooray!!

A Very Little Llama Pattern (UK)

(For US, dc is the same as sc and dc2tog is the same as sc2tog).

Abbreviations:
ch = chain
sl st = slip stitch
dc = double crochet
dc2tog = double crochet 2 together**
sts = stitches
**to make the dc2tog stitch using the invisible decrease method:
Insert hook into the front loop of the first stitch.
Insert hook into the front loop of the second stitch (3 loops on hook).
Yarn over and pull yarn through the first two loops (2 loops on hook).
Yarn over and pull through both loops.


You will need:
Yarn and hook of your choice (any weight yarn and hook to match will work)
I used a 3mm hook and small amounts of Rico Ricorumi in Beige (55), Tangerine (26), Wine Red (29) and Fuchsia (14)
Toy stuffing
Black / brown embroidery thread for nose and eyes
Stitchmarker - mark the first st of each round



Head
Stuff as you go.
In Beige:
Rnd 1: 6dc in magic ring or 2dc, 6dc in 2nd st from hook (6 sts)
Rnd 2: 2 dc in each st around. (12 sts)
Rnds 3 - 4: 1dc in each st around.
Rnd 5: (1dc, 2dc in next st) repeat around. (18 sts)
Rnds 6 - 8: 1dc in each st around.
Rnd 9: (1dc, dc2tog) repeat around. (12 sts)

Stitch eyes and nose.

Rnd 10: dc2tog around. (6 sts)

Fasten off and sew closed.

Ears (make 2)
Rnd 1: 6dc in magic ring or 2dc, 6dc in 2nd st from hook. (6 sts)
Rnd 2: (1dc, 2dc in next st) repeat around. (9 sts)
Fasten off. Sew to head


Neck, body and legs
(Leave long tail at beginning for stitching to head and stuff as you go)
Ch 6, join with sl st to first ch.

Rnd 1: 1ch (doesn't count as st), 1dc in each st. (6 sts) 
Now in continuous rounds
Rnds 2 - 5: 1dc in each st.
Rnd 6: *1dc, 2dc in next st; rep from *, 2dc. (8 sts)
Rnd 7: 2dc, *2dc in next st; rep from * three times, 3dc. (11 sts)
Rnd 8: 3dc, *2dc in next st; rep from * four times, 4dc. (15 sts)
Rnd 9: 4dc, *2dc in next st; rep from * six times, 5dc. (21 sts)
Rnds 10 - 13: 1dc in each st.

Front leg
Rnd 14: 1dc, dc2tog, dc 4, then cross to the other side (see pic) and 4dc back to stitchmarker. (10 sts)


Pictures from Giraffe Pattern






Rnd 15: dc2tog around. (5 sts).
Fasten off and sew closed.

Back leg
Rnd 14a: 1dc in each st around. (10 sts)
Rnd 15a: dc2tog around. (5 sts).

Fasten off and sew closed. 
Stitch between the legs to close the hole.
Stitch head to body.

Tail
Make a knot in the yarn and stitch it into place. Separate the strands to create the tail.

Blanket
In Tangerine
Rnd 1: 6dc in magic ring or 2dc, 6dc in 2nd st from hook. (6 sts)
Rnd 2: *2dc in first st, 2dc in next st, 1dc; rep from *.  (10 sts)
Rnd 3: In Fuchsia, 1dc, 2dc in next st, 2dc in next st, 3dc, 2dc in next st, 2dc in next st, 2dc. (14 sts)
Rnd 4: In Red, 2dc, 2dc in next st, 2dc in next st, 5dc, 2dc in next st, 2dc in next st, 3dc. (18 sts)
Fasten off, but leave a long tail for stitching in place

Halter
Make a chain long enough to fit around the muzzle and join with sl st. Make another chain to fit around back of head and join with sl st to other side. Stitch in place.

To finish:
Add tassels of yarn to tips of ears and sides of muzzle. Add pompoms or any other decorations you like.



And that's it!
Enjoy your teeny llama,

Sarah xx



Saturday, 7 July 2018

The (not my idea) t-shirt yarn bag



I cannot take any credit for the idea behind this bag - you see my good friend, Sharna made one and shared it on Instagram and I loved it.

Find Sharna's inspiring Insta feed here and her blog here

A quick search through my stash at home revealed lots of odds and ends of t-shirt yarn and a deeper dig unearthed some wooden bag handles, too.

And so, inspired by her totally marvellous idea, I decided to come up with my own original design pretty much completely copy it.

If you'd also like to be cool like Sharna and strut around with a copy-cat bag like me, then here's what to do:


You'll need around 350g-ish of t-shirt yarn oddments, a 15mm hook and D-shaped wooden handles (approx 17cms width) find similar here. (Some of my t-shirt yarn was a bit thin, so I worked holding two strands together to even things up a bit.) 

Pattern UK terms (US below)

Make Two

Rnd 1: 4ch (counts as 1ch and 1tr), make 7tr in 4th ch from hook. Join with sl st to 3rd ch. (8sts)

Rnd 2: 2ch, 1tr in same st (counts as tr2tog), 1ch, [tr2tog, 1ch] in each st around. Join with sl st to 1st st. (8st, 8ch)

Rnd 3: Beginning in any 1ch-sp, [2ch, 1tr (counts as tr2tog), 1ch, tr2tog] in 1ch-sp, [tr2tog, 1ch, tr2tog] in each 1ch-sp around. Join with sl st to 1st st. (16sts, 8ch)

Rnd 4: Beginning in any 1ch-sp, [3ch, 1tr, 2ch, 2tr] in 1ch-sp, 2tr between the next two sts, 2tr in 1ch-sp, 2tr between next two sts, *[2tr, 2ch, 2tr] in same 1ch-sp, 2tr between the next two sts, 2tr in 1ch-sp, 2tr between next two sts; rep from * around. Join with sl st to 3rd ch. (40 sts, 8ch)

Handle/joining

Rnd 1: (this will vary slightly, depending on your handle). Beginning with one of the squares, in any 2ch-sp, [1ch, 2dc] in 2ch-sp, 1dc BLO in each st over handle, 2dc in 1ch-sp
Now put the other square, with WS facing the WS of the piece you are working on. Make 1dc in the same 2ch-sp and the corresponding 2ch-sp of the square behind, then work your way around the two pieces, joining them by working 1dc BLO of front square to join FLO of back square. Make 3dc in the 2ch-sp space and repeat around, making 1dc in the first 2ch sp where you started.
Now you will just work across the back square. Make 2dc in the same 2ch-sp, 1dc FLO in each st over handle, 2dc in 1ch-sp.

Fasten off, weave in ends.
(Or if you're really lazy like me, tie the ends in a knot on the inside of the bag and snip them.

Job done.
Enjoy your bag - it really is the perfect summer accessory!



Pattern US terms 
Make Two

Rnd 1: 4ch (counts as 1ch and 1dc), make 7dc in 4th ch from hook. Join with sl st to 3rd ch. (8sts)

Rnd 2: 2ch, 1dc in same st (counts as dc2tog), 1ch, [dc2tog, 1ch] in each st around. Join with sl st to 1st st (8st, 8ch)

Rnd 3: Beginning in any 1ch-sp, [2ch, 1dc (counts as dc2tog), 1ch, dc2tog] in 1ch-sp, [dc2tog, 1ch, dc2tog] in each 1ch-sp around. Join with sl st to 1st st. (16sts, 8ch)

Rnd 4: Beginning in any 1ch-sp, [3ch, 1dc, 2ch, 2dc] in 1ch-sp, 2dc between the next two sts, 2dc in 1ch-sp, 2dc between next two sts, *[2dc, 2ch, 2dc] in same 1ch-sp, 2dc between the next two sts, 2dc in 1ch-sp, 2dc between next two sts; rep from * around. Join with sl st to 3rd ch. (40 sts, 8ch)

Handle/joining

Rnd 1: (this will vary slightly, depending on your handle). Beginning with one of the squares, in any 2ch-sp, [1ch, 2sc] in 2ch-sp, 1sc BLO in each st over handle, 2sc in 1ch-sp
Now put the other square, with WS facing the WS of the piece you are working on. Make 1sc in the same 2ch-sp and the corresponding 2ch-sp of the square behind, then work your way around the two pieces, joining them by working 1sc BLO of front square to join FLO of back square. Make 3sc in the 2ch-sp space and repeat around, making 1sc in the first 2ch sp where you started.
Now you will just work across the back square. Make 2sc in the same 2ch-sp, 1sc FLO in each st over handle, 2sc in 1ch-sp.

Fasten off, weave in ends.
(Or if you're really lazy like me, tie the ends in a knot on the inside of the bag and snip them.

Job done.
Enjoy your bag - it really is the perfect summer accessory!

Have a great weekend,

Sarah xx

Thursday, 7 June 2018

Summer Bunting

Bunting

The perfect way to brighten up a mantlepiece, hang across the garden or adorn an otherwise plain wall.





And the Mister hates it, of course, but let's not worry about that for now...


Recently, I was sent a beautiful set of these Ricorumi cotton DK yarns to try. At just 25g each, they are designed especially for crocheting small Amigurumi and I thought they'd be brilliant for my bunting.


And so I've created* an easy peasy pattern which uses some of the pretty, summery colours available. You could any yarn you like for this - it would be a great stash-busting project. 

*I say 'created, but really this pattern is based on a traditional Granny Triangle pattern, which you can find everywhere. I just decided to add a dangly-bit. To make it pretty.




To make pom-pom: (US tr3tog = dc3tog)
(3ch, in 3rd ch from hook, tr3tog) twice, sl st at base of first tr3tog to close pompom (see blue arrow)


UK version (US below)
I used:
1 x 25g ball each of Rico Design 'Ricorumi' in Vanilla (5), Salmon (21), Nude (23), Light Blue (33) and Pale Green (45)
3.5 mm hook

4ch (counts as 1ch and 1tr)

Rnd 1: 2tr in 4th ch from hook, 3ch, [3tr, 3ch] twice. Join with sl st to 4th ch. 

Rnd 2: in any 3ch-sp, 3ch (counts as tr throughout) 2tr, 3ch, 3tr, 1ch in same sp, *[3tr, 3ch, 3tr, 1ch] in next 3ch-sp; repeat from * twice. Join with sl st to 3rd ch.

Rnd 3: in any 3ch-sp, [3ch, 2tr, 3ch, 3tr, 1ch] in same sp,  [3tr, 1ch] in next 1ch-sp, *[3tr, 3ch, 3tr, 1ch] in next 3ch-sp, [3tr, 1ch] in next 1ch-sp; repeat from * twice. Join with sl st to 3rd ch.

Rnd 4: in any 3ch-sp, [3ch, 2tr, 3ch, 3tr, 1ch] in same sp,  (3tr, 1ch in next 1ch-sp) twice, [3tr, 2ch, pompom, 2ch, 3tr, 1ch] in next 3ch-sp, (3tr, 1ch in next 1ch-sp) twice, [3tr, 3ch, 3tr] in next 3ch-sp, (3tr, 1ch in next 1ch-sp) twice. Join with sl st to 3rd ch.

Joining

20ch at beginning for hanging loop, then make [3tr, 1ch] in each 1ch-sp. When joining the next triangle, omit the 1ch.

US version

4ch (counts as 1ch and 1dc)

Rnd 1: 2tr in 4th ch from hook, 3ch, [3dc, 3ch] twice. Join with sl st to 4th ch. 

Rnd 2: in any 3ch-sp, 3ch (counts as dc throughout) 2dc, 3ch, 3dc, 1ch in same sp, *[3dc, 3ch, 3dc, 1ch] in next 3ch-sp; repeat from * twice. Join with sl st to 3rd ch.

Rnd 3: in any 3ch-sp, [3ch, 2dc, 3ch, 3dc, 1ch] in same sp,  [3dc, 1ch] in next 1ch-sp, *[3dc, 3ch, 3dc, 1ch] in next 3ch-sp, [3dc, 1ch] in next 1ch-sp; repeat from * twice. Join with sl st to 3rd ch.

Rnd 4: in any 3ch-sp, [3ch, 2dc, 3ch, 3dc, 1ch] in same sp,  (3dc, 1ch in next 1ch-sp) twice, [3dc, 2ch, pompom, 2ch, 3dc, 1ch] in next 3ch-sp, (3dc, 1ch in next 1ch-sp) twice, [3dc, 3ch, 3dc] in next 3ch-sp, (3dc, 1ch in next 1ch-sp) twice. Join with sl st to 3rd ch.

Joining

20ch at beginning for hanging loop, then make [3dc, 1ch] in each 1ch-sp. When joining the next triangle, omit the 1ch.



And that's it. It goes without saying that you can keep adding triangles until your bunting measures the length you desire. And if, like me, you REALLY want to annoy your other half, just keep making more and more and more to festoon every corner of your home.

Have a great week,
Sarah xx

Wednesday, 2 May 2018

CrochetZine

CrochetZine

It's brand new, shiny, online magazine about all things CROCHET - and I'm super-proud to be part of the creative team behind it. 




So what is this exactly? 
It's a magazine with just 12 pages. In each monthly issue, we plan to feature two free patterns, articles about designers, makers and current topics, some funny stuff and a brilliant giveaway. The idea is that it's just about long enough for you to read in your tea-break. And feedback from our readers so far, has been amazing.


CrochetZine is the brain child of Sharna Moore (one of my crochet besties) and I was thrilled to be asked if I'd like to be part of the team, along with Chrissie Asbridge (my other crochet bestie). Now, you'll need to read the mag to find out how it all got started, but we've discovered that we're a bit of a dream team, which is so important when you're beginning a new venture, isn't it?

Find the pattern for these coasters in Issue One

Here's how it works: 
Sharna is the really arty, crafty one. She's beautifully creative, has a bazillion original ideas in her head and is a throughly nice person.
Chrissie, apart from also being amazingly talented at crochet and embroidery and having a very successful YouTube Channel, has a background as an Editor and is also a thoroughly nice person.
Me? I'm a designer, maker and author and can write and check patterns and, with being a teacher, am quite the organiser.

And so you see, it all works rather well.

If you'd like to have a read, and see what all the fuss is about, then read CrochetZine here.


CrochetZine is the first Instagram crochet magazine; 12 squares of crochet goodness delivered to your IG feed every month.

Join us for the ride as we’ll be featuring patterns you REALLY want to make, features and articles you REALLY want to read and some of the newest and coolest designers and makers on the block you REALLY want to meet.

I hope you enjoy it!!

Sarah xx



Sunday, 1 April 2018

Caught By The Sea Shawl Kit Preview

Just recently, I was asked by Veronika Cromwell of The Blue Star Crochet Company whether I'd like another a shawl for my shawlf (my shawl-shelf).


If you're a regular reader, then you'll know that my shawlf is pretty jam-packed with all the shawls, cowls, wraps and various neck-attire you could possibly imagine because I just love to make them and so obviously, I couldn't say no.



Veronika is the designer behind The Blue Star Crochet Company and a quick peek at her Etsy shop reveals a plethora of beautiful patterns for accessories and garments. Now, the next big thing Veronika is launching is not just a pattern for her gorgeous Caught By The Sea Shawl, but the whole kit - everything you need to make it and a a few little extras, too.

Have eaten biscuit and drunk tea already, obvs

Here's what the kit contains:

  • 1 x 100g hand-dyed skein of 100% Falkland Merino British wool, with two colour ways to choose from, both dyed by Sheena Proudlock of The Mermaid's Purse and exclusive to this kit.

I chose the colour 'Dolphin Shore' 

  • Pattern leaflet, with code for Ravelry download, too (also exclusive to the kit and which also contains further support codes and charts)
  • 5mm crochet hook
Gah, I'm a sucker for a cute stitch-marker

  • 2 x stitch markers
  • Sweet treat and tea
  • further discount codes for 15% off Blue Star Crochet Company patterns and The Mermaid's Purse Yarns
The kit is available to pre-order from the 1st April 2018 (and all for just £21.99, plus postage).
AND I have a discount code for you - just use the code ANNABOO1418 to receive 10% when you order your kit!

This yarn is DREAMY soft and gorgeous


And so I'd like to say a big well done to Veronika - I think the kit is really superb and great quality and the pattern looks just lovely- it would make the perfect present for someone else, or special gift to yourself.

*If you'd like to see the unboxing of this shawl kit, then check out my stories on Instagram*

I cannot wait to make a start on mine - that yarn is HEAVENLY.

Wishing you all Happy Easter weekend,
Sarah xx

Sunday, 25 March 2018

The one with the tadpoles

Yes, you did read that correctly.

TADPOLES



You see, a couple of weeks ago, we (not me, I hasten to add - this was something the Mister and kids are responsible for) picked up a teeny little bit of frogspawn from a muddy puddle in a field.

And now we have tadpoles.



Eleventy-billion of them, to be precise.

(For anyone who hasn't seen tadpoles before, they are the aquatic lavae of amphibians - in this case, frogs. Find out more about them here.)

We are feeding them all sorts of stuff (so far, raw minced meat has been their favourite) and are enjoying watching them change and grow. And grow.. And grow...

I'm even documenting their daily progress on my Instagram Stories (it's Day 28 of #frogwatch, if you're interested) which is proving very popular with my followers and I receive lots of comments from people telling me how much they enjoy tuning in each day to see how the tadpoles are getting on.

And so it seemed appropriate to crochet one. In fact, I'd like to make a whole set for every stage of their development, but we'll see.



If you fancy making a crocheted tadpole (I cannot think of a single reason why you wouldn't) then here's the pattern in UK terms (US below):

Tadpole Pattern (UK)

Pattern notes:
The tadpole is crocheted in continuous rounds. Use a stitch marker to mark the first stitch of every round. Stuff as you go.

You will need:
A small amount of yarn in black and grey and a hook to match. 
I used Rico Creative Cotton Aran in Black and Mouse Grey and a 3.5mm hook 
Toy Stuffing
2 x 9mm safety eyes

Head and tail
Rnd 1: using Black, 6dc in magic ring, or 2ch, 6dc in 2nd ch from hook (6 sts)
Rnd 2: 1dc in each st around.
Rnd 3: 2dc in each st around. (12 sts)
Rnd 4: 1dc in each st around.
Rnd 5: (1dc, 2dc in next st) around. (18 sts)
Rnds 6 - 9: 1dc in each st around.
Insert eyes between rnds 4 - 5; 6 sts apart.
Rnd 10: (1dc, dc2tog) around. (12 sts)
Rnd 11: 1dc in each st around.
Rnd 12: dc2tog around (6 sts)
Rnds 13 - 25: 1dc in each st around.
Rnd 26: dc2tog around (3 sts)
Rnd 27: 2dc, leaving 1st unworked.
Fasten off, weave in ends.

Tail Fins (make 2)

Using Grey, 15ch.
Along the length of the chain, make one of each st in each of the chain stitches:
1sl st, 2dc, 2htr, 5tr, 2htr, 2dc, 1sl st.
Fasten off, leave long tail for sewing to tail.
Using the yarn ends, stitch the tail fins in place.

Tadpole Pattern (US)

Pattern notes:
The tadpole is crocheted in continuous rounds. Use a stitch marker to mark the first stitch of every round. Stuff as you go.

You will need:
A small amount of yarn in black and grey and a hook to match. 
I used Rico Creative Cotton Aran in Black and Mouse Grey and a 3.5mm hook 
Toy Stuffing
2 x 9mm safety eyes

Head and tail
Rnd 1: using Black, 6sc in magic ring, or 2ch, 6sc in 2nd ch from hook (6 sts)
Rnd 2: 1sc in each st around.
Rnd 3: 2sc in each st around. (12 sts)
Rnd 4: 1sc in each st around.
Rnd 5: (1sc, 2sc in next st) around. (18 sts)
Rnds 6 - 9: 1sc in each st around.
Insert eyes between rnds 4 - 5; 6 sts apart.
Rnd 10: (1sc, sc2tog) around. (12 sts)
Rnd 11: 1sc in each st around.
Rnd 12: sc2tog around (6 sts)
Rnds 13 - 25: 1sc in each st around.
Rnd 26: sc2tog around (3 sts)
Rnd 27: 2sc, leaving 1st unworked.
Fasten off, weave in ends.

Tail Fins (make 2)

Using Grey, 15ch.
Along the length of the chain, make one of each st in each of the chain stitches:
1sl st, 2sc, 2hdc, 5dc, 2hdc, 2sc, 1sl st.
Fasten off, leave long tail for sewing to tail.
Using the yarn ends, stitch the tail fins in place.



The plan, of course is to watch them grow into froglets and release them back where they were found ... (before they take over the house like a Biblical plague).

Enjoy!

Sarah xx


Friday, 23 February 2018

The Last Cowl

Ok. So I know I have been a BIT obsessed with cowls and scarves and wraps and all things shawl-y recently, but I PROMISE this is the last scarf pattern for a while, especially as Spring is supposedly just around the corner.

But as we are due some verrrry cold weather here in the UK, I couldn't resist making a gorgeously soft and cosy cowl with some super-chunky and super-gorgeous yarn. And it will be my last one for now. 

I promise.




This is the stuff:



Isn't is lush?
Bet you wish you had squish-o-vision ...

It's called Naturalia by Borgo de Pazzi and you can find it at Woolly Mahoosive. (AND you can receive 10% off this yarn with the code Annaboos)



And so I made a loooooong cowl. The sort you can wrap around twice for extra-cosiness.

The pattern is extremely difficult * very easy and very quick.

*I'd love to actually write that on one of my patterns, but no. Simple all the way

You need 1 x 200g / 120m hank of Naturalia by Borgo De Pazzi (or similar)
and a 15mm hook

UK Pattern: (US below)

ch 13
Row 1: 1tr in 4th ch from hook and each st, turn. (11 sts)
Rows 2 - 3: 3ch (counts as tr throughout), 1tr in each st, turn.
Row 4: 3ch, 4tr, 1ch, sk st, 5tr, turn.
Row 5: 3ch, 2tr, 1ch, sk st, 1tr, 1tr in 1ch-sp, 1tr, 1ch, sk st, 3tr, turn.
Row 6: 4ch (counts as 1tr + 1ch), sk st, 1tr, 1tr in 1ch-sp, 3tr, 1tr in 1ch-sp, 1tr, 1ch, sk st, 1tr, turn.
Row 7: Repeat row 5
Rows 8 - 36: repeat rows 4-7
Rows 37 - 38: Repeat rows 2-3
Do not fasten off - slip stitch the top and bottom edges together.

Fasten off and weave in ends.


US Pattern:

ch 13
Row 1: 1dc in 4th ch from hook and each st, turn. (11 sts)
Rows 2 - 3: 3ch (counts as dc throughout), 1dc in each st, turn.
Row 4: 3ch, 4dc, 1ch, sk st, 5dc, turn.
Row 5: 3ch, 2dc, 1ch, sk st, 1dc, 1dc in 1ch-sp, 1dc, 1ch, sk st, 3dc, turn.
Row 6: 4ch (counts as 1dc + 1ch), sk st, 1dc, 1dc in 1ch-sp, 3dc, 1dc in 1ch-sp, 1dc, 1ch, sk st, 1dc, turn.
Row 7: Repeat row 5
Rows 8 - 36: repeat rows 4-7
Rows 37 - 38: Repeat rows 2-3
Do not fasten off - slip stitch the top and bottom edges together.

Fasten off and weave in ends.

So there you are.
I intend to wear this for the entirety of next week, whilst the Siberian winter takes it grip.



Keep cosy!

Sarah xxxx

Friday, 26 January 2018

Swift Knit MEGA scarves

Those of you who have been reading my blog for a while will know that I am a chunky-yarn-lover. 


The bigger the better, in my opinion. 


My good friends at Stylecraft Yarns are no strangers to chunky yarn and recently, I used Swift Knit for my slouchy hat in Supersize Crochet - I just loved the softness and warmth of the yarn and the way the different colours worked together. So when they launched Swift Knit MEGA and asked if any of the Blogstars would like to try it, I knew it would be a winner.

And I wasn't disappoined. It's the same mix of 80% Acrylic 20% Wool, but in a huge 200g ball, with 70m of yarn and a recommended hook/needle of 15mm.



















My first experiments were with crochet, where I tried an easy textured stitch and I loved the result. In fact, I adapted this slightly and used the Wedgewood colourway for a super-chunky cowl in Issue 97 of Inside Crochet magazine.


Now, you might have noticed that there has also been a LOT of knitting going on here recently. I am loving the easy-knit projects I've been working on and, as someone who is still a novice in these matters, simplicity is the way forward for me.

And so, when the kids asked for warm scarves, I knew exactly what I'd do with my Swift Knit Mega: knit them in one each in garter stitch.



There are two things I love about garter stitch: 
1) it's just knit stitch on repeat
2) it's SOOOOOOO squishy 

The Swift Knit Mega works beautifully in this pattern - I love the subtle colour changes and the squishiness of the yarn is just perfection. Plus, it only takes one ball to make a good-length scarf.


Here's what you'll need if you want to make one:

1x ball of Stylecraft Swift Knit Mega; my colours were Peony (2143) and Wedgewood (2144)
15mm needles

Cast on 8 stitches
Knit every row until you run out of yarn, leaving enough for cast-off.

Job done.
Happy kids.

If you'd like to read more about the Stylecraft Blogstars and see what they've been up to, then follow the link.

Enjoy your week, and stay warm
Sarah xxx





Friday, 19 January 2018

Batik Swirl Wrap (and a little giveaway)

It's the newest member of the Stylecraft Batik family

and it's perfect for lazy crafters like me who cannot bear sewing in  ALLLLLLL the ends.



Batik Whirl is a yarn-cake of loveliness.




Stylecraft's Batik Yarn has been around for a little while now and I'm a really big fan, I have to say. I recently designed a shawl for Inside Crochet Magazine using the Batik solids range and I enjoyed working with it - the yarn has a nice bounce to it and the stitch definition is great.



The next release was the Batik Elements range. A collection with a different range of shades within a ball, designed to work alongside the Solids. Again, the same quality yarn with the same feel and effect. With this, I designed my Learn to Knit Shawl.





And now there's the Swirl.... it's a big, 200g cake with up to five different colours, which are repeated and at the mo, there are six different colour ways. I chose Purple Mist - a collection of greys and purples and different to any of my other shawls, scarves or wraps.

So I thought I'd make a rectangular sort-of half-blanket that you can wear as a wrap or a scarf. 
(Because let's face it,  I've hardly got any ...)




I designed this to be easy (cos I don't do difficult) but also to be the kind of project you can sit and make in the evenings, whilst watching your favourite thing on the telly-box.







I made mine with two swirls (400g), but you could make a narrower version with just one - instructions are given for both.


You will need:

2 x Batik swirl for wider wrap like mine or 1 x if making a narrower version. - I used Purple Mist (shade 3730)
or around 400g / 1100m (200m / 550m for narrower version) of dk yarn
4.5mm hook

Finished size approx: 47cm x 150 cm (wide version) 22cm x 150 cm (narrow version)
Gauge: approximately 16.5 stitches and 9 rows to 10cm

Chart showing rows 6 - 9:



UK Pattern

Abbreviations:
Stitch(es) st(s)
Chain ch
Treble Crochet tr.

ch 79 (wide version) or 40 (narrower version)
Row 1: beginning in 4th ch from hook, make 1tr in each st across, turn.
Rows 2 - 6: 3ch (counts as tr here and throughout), beginning in 5th ch from hook, 1tr in each st across, turn.
Row 7: 3ch, 3tr in 6th st from hook, sk 2 sts, *3tr in next st, sk 2 sts; repeat from * until 2 sts left, sk 1 st, 1tr in last st, turn.
Row 8: 3ch, 1tr in space before first treble cluster, 3tr in each space between clusters, 1tr in space after last cluster, 1tr in last st.
Row 9: 3ch, 3tr in each space between clusters, 1tr in last st.
Rows 10 - 135: (approx): repeat rows 8 and 9 alternately.
Rows 136 - 140: repeat rows 2 - 6.
Fasten off, weave in ends.


US Pattern

Abbreviations:
Stitch(es) st(s)
Chain ch
Double Crochet dc

ch 79 (wide version) or 40 (narrower version)
Row 1: beginning in 4th ch from hook, make 1dc in each st across, turn.
Rows 2 - 6: 3ch (counts as dc here and throughout), beginning in 5th ch from hook, 1dc in each st across, turn.
Row 7: 3ch, 3dc in 6th st from hook, sk 2 sts, *3dc in next st, sk 2 sts; repeat from *, until 2 sts left, sk 1 st, 1dc in last st, turn.
Row 8: 3ch, 1dc in space before first treble cluster, 3dc in each space between clusters, 1dc in space after last cluster, 1dc in last st.
Row 9: 3ch, 3dc in each space between clusters, 1dc in last st.
Rows 10 - 135: (approx): repeat rows 8 and 9 alternately.
Rows 136 - 140: repeat rows 2 - 6.
Fasten off, weave in ends.

I just love this wrap! It's very soft and with the added wool content, it's really warm, too. Perfect as a chunky scarf to keep out the chills when I'm out and about, or as a wrap-blanket (a wraplet?) to snuggle up with on those draughty evenings on the sofa.
Perfect.

If you'd like to win a cake of the very lovely Batik Swirl in Purple Mist, then simply enter the giveaway below:

a Rafflecopter giveaway


I'll draw it on Thursday 25th Jan 2018. Open worldwide.



Hope you like the pattern and good luck in the giveaway!

Sarah xxx






Saturday, 13 January 2018

The Big Crochet Stayaway



Imagine a weekend spent in a beautiful converted barn in the middle of the stunning Herfordshire countryside...

Imagine a big Christmas tree, a roaring fire and a sprinkling of snow...
Pretty idyllic, huh?


Now add to that endless crochet, crafty workshops galore, enough yarn to sink a ship, a thoroughly knowledgeable and convivial host and you're getting pretty close to something I'd call Heaven. 
And I haven't even mentioned the amazing food, luxurious bedrooms or the blimmin' good company of terrific like-minded gals I shared it with.

THIS, people is the Big Crochet Stayaway.



A few months ago, I met the lovely Louisa of Komodo Krafts at the Knitting and Stitching Show at Ally Pally. You can imagine my utter delight when she kindly asked if I'd like to be a guest at the December weekend. Well, I nearly bit her hand off with my enthusiasm. A weekend away? Without the kids? With ALL the crochet? I could not say no.


The Big Crochet Stayaway is the brain-child of Louisa. She lives in Hertfordshire with her partner and decided to switch her corporate career for something more crafty after the birth of her daughter. Within a short time, she began to run workshops and sell yarn and so Komodo Krafts was launched. As for the retreats, Louisa says that she fell in love with the idea of spending weekends with like-minded crafters and as there wasn't anything in her local area, decided to set up her own.


Now, for those of you who are a bit nervous about spending the entire weekend with a bunch of people you've never met before, you needn't worry. Louisa made lots of contact with us all beforehand, sending us a very full programme of events for the weekend and even set up a Facebook group so that we could chat to each other before meeting. 


And so, on the Friday evening, we all arrived at the barn for welcome drinks - and I have to say, the accommodation is absolutely spectacular. The barn is situated on a working farm and used to house the pigs! Thankfully, the only remaining porcine features are those in pictures on the walls. The living area is huge, with underfloor heating and plenty of comfy sofas and on the other side of the enormous fireplace, a large table for eating and working at. To the side of this are the huge kitchen, where our brilliant cook worked her magic and the large bedrooms, each with ensuite facilities. 


Once we'd all made our introductions and were settled with a beverage of our choice, Louisa showed  us the weekend crochet project: her beautiful Holly and Ivy table runner. 


This project was designed to suit all abilities and Louisa, an experienced crocheter who was taught by her nan when she was little, was on hand to provide support and advice on all manner of crochet queries throughout the weekend.


After a fab dinner, it was time for our first workshop - Spinning with Caz from Wulla


Caz is one of the Komodo Krafts team and is an indie spinner and dyer of big yarns with attitude. Now, I've never done anything like this before, so was totally enthralled by the whole thing. 


Caz is an amazing tutor and showed us how to spin using a drop spindle and then on her spinning wheel, which we were then invited to try. And if that wasn't enough, we we each given a goody bag with fleeces and our very own drop spindle. 


Saturday was a bright and beautiful morning and once a delicious breakfast had been consumed by all, we were joined by a day guest, who was immediately made to feel welcome and it was time for our first crochet workshop of the day and: another of Louisa's fab patterns -her Slouchy Sprig Hat.


Louisa's crochet designs suited the weekend perfectly - easy enough for a beginner to pick up, especially with all the support on hand, but challenging enough for even the most seasoned of crocheters. Louisa strives to design things that have modern edge to them,  'I spent most of my life being called "Granny" because I crocheted, so I think it's important that our generation of crocheters is standing up and saying ... actually we make really cool stuff!' 


The next workshop was embroidery, taught by Ellen from The Sewing Alchemist, who arrived with the biggest, most colourful selection of threads I've ever seen, along with lots of examples of her beautiful and quirky pieces. 



We were shown how to attach the fabric to the hoops and how to make the stitches over the template for our 'Merry and Bright' Christmas stitching. Embroidery is another craft I've never really tackled, but this was so enjoyable and very, very relaxing.


And after this, there were even more crochet projects on offer to anyone who wanted to try - Light-up Neon snowflake, anyone? 


This is such a fun project (free pattern here) which we made in Bobbiny Cord and threaded through neon lights, which made them absolutely amazing.

Now, what to say about Sunday? Well, we woke up to this:


Yep. About a foot of snow. 
Completely magical of course, especially for a Christmas workshop...
But this did pose some problems... it meant that our rag-rugging workshop had to be cancelled as the tutor couldn't actually get to us. Not that we were worried - we had Gingerbread Christmas Baubles to crochet (free pattern here) tea to drink and good company to enjoy (and enough yarn to crochet ourselves warm jumpers, if needed). 


But sadly, the weekend had to end. And so after lunch, and a little earlier than anticipated due to the weather, we packed our cars with all the lovely yarny things, said our fond farewells and made our way through the snowy landscapes back to our homes.


I have to admit, it was one of the most enjoyable, relaxing, fun weekends away I think I've ever been to. I felt thoroughly spoiled with the great variety of workshops, the generous goody bags (including hand-made stockings filled with brilliant presents) and the really fabulous company I spent it with. Louisa is a wonderful host who made sure that everyone was happy and her enthusiasm for crafting and crochet is infectious.

'I love watching people become friends, I love learning about different people. I also love a weekend away from my own home! I really enjoy everything about it; planning the agenda, speaking to guest workshop runners, sourcing items from small businesses. I strive to support other small businesses with my own and the retreat gives me so many opportunities to do that.'


If you're interested in attending a retreat with Komodo Krafts (and I thoroughly recommend it), or attending a day workshop or organising some private tuition with Louisa, then check out here for details of all events.

I hope you enjoy some crafty R&R
Sarah xxx